Conservation

To leave a little bit of the world as beautiful as we found it.

One of the primary places we take our guests on adventures is Phnom Kulen National Park (PKNP). Since 2012 local NGOs have partnered with the Ministry of Environment to conduct biodiversity surveys in PKNP. Their findings have confirmed a high diversity of flora and fauna, with more than twenty recorded species of global conservation concern. One such species is the endangered Indochinese Silvered Langur, of which Cambodia is considered its last stronghold. These species are under severe threat from hunting, forest fragmentation, and habitat loss to due to illegal logging and rotating slash-and-burn agriculture.

Conservation1

PKNP also functions as Siem Reap province’s primary water source. The western and eastern plateaus that comprise the park’s expanse serve as an essential water catchment area, which provides water to the majority of the province and Cambodia’s third largest city, Siem Reap town. The province’s extensive agricultural system and immense tourism industry (Angkorian temples) rely on the sustainability of Phnom Kulen National Park and its water supply. Without forest cover, the park will be unable to withstand such a high demand on its resources.

Evidence of illegal logging.

Evidence of illegal logging.

Because Indochine-ex benefits from the beauty and culture within PKNP, we have invested in sustainable solutions for the park and its inhabitants. We support projects that aim to protect the park’s biodiversity and forest canopy. We also support projects that in protecting the ecosystem also create alternative livelihoods for community members working and living in the park. When we travel into the park, we employ locals whenever possible, in addition to making monthly contributions to projects aiming to employ locals in trades alternative to logging and hunting.

Photographic evidence of the endangered Indochinese silvered langur in Phnom Kulen National Park.

Photographic evidence of the endangered Indochinese silvered langur in Phnom Kulen National Park.

One such example, we support the Kulen Nature Trails, a project aimed at protecting the endangered Indochinese silvered langur’s habitat while simultaneously creating local jobs for Poipel and Preah Ang Thom community members. These individuals serve as guides, taking visitors through the trails. This model creates an alternative revenue source for local villages, as well as protecting the surrounding area where langurs are known to live. Additionally, a portion of the revenue created from these trails is put directly towards trail maintenance and patrolling, to further protect the forest from hunting and logging.

 

Local guide Chomreun and MoE Ranger Phum overlooking the Kulen Nature Trails.

Local guide Chomreun and MoE Ranger Phum overlooking the Kulen Nature Trails.

We have committed to supporting this initiative until the income from visitors allows it to be a self-sustaining project. Indochine-ex will increase its commitment to conservation as it grows (fingers crossed), giving villagers who depend on their land an opportunity to earn an income by sustainably sharing it with our guests.